Friday, July 25, 2014

CASL Kickoff Event Coaching Education Schedule



CASL Annual Kickoff Event
August 16th
Wake Med Soccer Park
3-6pm on Field #3

Coaching Education/Clinic Schedule (in process)
3-4pm
Bryan Farnsworth
Director of Coaching Education and Player Development
U7-U8 coach meeting


4-4:30pm
Andy Tait
U9-U11 Girls Youth Director
“When to Dribble and When to Pass”
Bryan Farnsworth
Director of Coaching Education and Player Development

U5-U6 “Grid Activities”

4:30-5pm
Matt Brown
Director of Goalkeeping
“How to integrate goalkeepers into a possession session”
Bryan Farnsworth
Director of Coaching Education and Player Development

“How to plan, layout, and transition efficiently through a training session with the end goal in mind”
5-5:30pm
Tim Evans
U12-U14 Boys Program Director
U12-U14 Boys Director
“Passing Combinations
David Costa and Steve Cox
NC State Men’s Soccer
Session 1
5:30-6pm

David Costa and Steve Cox
NC State Men’s Soccer
Session 2


Monday, July 21, 2014

What Makes Great Teachers!!!

Quick. Take a moment and thing about the single greatest teacher you ever had.  Someone who inspired you, engaged you, and maybe even changed the trajectory of your life.
Perhaps it’s a coach, maybe a high-school teacher, maybe a relative—it doesn’t matter.
Now, picture their face. (Got it?)
When you think about this person, which of the following come to mind?
  1. A.      A life lesson that person taught you?
  2. B.      A goal that person helped you to achieve?
  3. C.      The way that person made you feel?

If you are like most people, it’s no contest, the answer is C.

The lesson of this simple exercise is simple—the greatest teachers aren't great just because they deliver information; they are great because they create lasting connections.  They’re not about the words they say, but more about the way they make you feel.

As volunteer youth soccer coaches, you have the opportunity to make lasting impressions with young people on a weekly basis.  You have the ability to connect with players and be the impressionable person in someone’s life that can have a profound impact in the trajectory in one’s life.  You have the opportunity in front of you to BE that special and profound teacher and coach.
I believe that there are two important aspects to being an impactful teacher and coach—what you say and how you say it.  In being a youth soccer coach there are many different situations that present themselves, either in training or in games.  You have the choice as to what type of teacher, coach, and mentor you will become with what you say and how you say it.  The same phrase can be screamed at a 10 year old boy 50 yards across the field, or it can be done more personably with your arm around them.  You have the choice as to the type of teacher and coach you will become.


This is a very important aspect to consider as a volunteer soccer coach, because of the lasting impact and connections that you are able to make with your players.  As a recreation and challenge soccer coach, you may have the good fortune to have a player or two that may develop into a high level soccer player who plays in college or even at the professional level.  Most of your current and future players will not achieve this level of success in their soccer careers, but they are the future of the game regardless.  Every player that you have the opportunity to coach and mentor, is a potential future soccer coach, soccer dad or soccer mom so the environment you create today, no doubt has potential long-range impacts on that player for future generations.

Thursday, July 17, 2014

CASL Fall Kickoff Event - August 16th


CASL Fall 2014 Kickoff Event
August 16th
Wake Med Soccer Park field #3
3-6pm


CASL Annual Kickoff event is scheduled on August 16th form 3-6pm at Wake Med soccer park.  Immediately following this event is a Railhawks game, so this is a great way to “kick off” the new CASL fall season.
Distribution of team packets and information will be held from 3-6pm on Wake Med field #3.  For any coaches that are interested in attending the Railhawks game this evening, we have secured 150 parking spaces in the VIP lot (parking passes will be provided).


Highlights of the event:
  • ·         Multiple door prizes will be awarded to any coach that attends the event (each coach gets a raffle ticket with drawing as the end of the event)

o   Ex: Training goals, Ball bags, Coach dry erase boards, training bibs, cones, coaching kit, etc.
  • ·         Scheduled coaching education session for recreation and challenge coaches from 3-6pm

o   Specific schedule will be updated and communicated
  • ·         Free play area setup for your kids that come and attend
  • ·         Opportunity to meet and greet the CASL staff
  • ·         Carolina Railhawks players will attend to engage with players and coaches


Tuesday, July 1, 2014

CASL Recreation Families,

Reminder that the NCYSA is hosting a recreation-only camp July 28- August 1 at the WRAL Soccer Center.


Wednesday, February 26, 2014

3 Most common mistakes first time soccer coaches make and how to avoid them

If you are new to world of soccer coaching and the challenge feels daunting then here’s some great advice on some of the most common mistakes and the steps required to avoid them.


1. Planning
Choose drills that are fun. All kids need to have fun otherwise you will loose their attention quickly. If you choose drills that are fun then the players will focus allowing you the coach to concentrate on teaching.  One of the greatest skills that a coach of young soccer players can develop is how to create fun, engaging activities that allow the players to learn and develop at the same time.

2. Over-coaching
Over-coaching means talking too much or in the wrong place. Trying to do too many drills or moving on too quickly. Don’t try to put too much into each session. You will often find that drills go on longer than intended. A good idea would be to have a buffer in place. For example an extension of a drill that can be skipped or included depending on whether or not the session is running to schedule.

One observation that I often see with coaches of very young players is that they talk too long.  Training sessions should be about the players playing and developing skills, not sitting in a circle on the ground with long conversations by the coach.  Additionally, spending only a few minutes speaking with the players before the game at at halftime and keep focus to 3 points.  Too much talking and addressing too many ideas can be overload to young players.  You will keep their focus and attention with brief, concise conversations better than long talks.

3. Focus
Finally focus. Remember that you are a development/youth level coach. It is therefore key that the players are developing each session. Even if the team isn't winning its important that the players can identify progress in their game and overall ability. Structure training sessions and the activities in each session to progress through a particular theme.  This keeps the players focus on one topic and allows you as the coach to focus on key coaching points over a 90 minute period of time.  

Thursday, February 20, 2014

Hello Coaches,

Here are some thoughts and ideas for a U7/8 training session with multiple activities that use the same training grid for the first part of the session.  I highly recommend that you allow the players the opportunity at every training session to just play (20+ minutes) with very little coaching.  Let them have fun and see if they can utilize some of the ideas and focus in the game phase that you work to teach them in the teaching phase of the session.


The first activity is essentially a square grid, either 10x10 or 15x15.  Use your best judgement on the size as you can always adjust it as you go along.  Have each player inside the grid with a ball with the coach on the perimeter driving the moments and activities.

  1. Start with players killing the ball (stopping with the sole of their foot) and then restarting their dribble.
  2. Next have the players "Kill the ball" and then move in the opposite direction.
  3. I use the explode command as well to get the players moving more actively.  When the coach calls explode, the players "Kill the ball" then must explode outside of the grid and then back to their ball.
  4. Finally, the coach can call "Switch" with the players killing the ball and then switching balls with a team mate.
There are countless different activities that you can have your players do in a similar setup.  Examples are you can have the players touch body parts to the ball, after killing the ball (butt, head, elbow).  Players can "kill the ball" then run a quick circle around the ball, players can "kill the ball" then hop over the ball.  You can incorporate specific turns, changes in direction, tag activities just to name a few.  Be creative and vary it up with your players over the course of the season.

This next activity can use the exact same grid you used in the first activity, but with the addition of many gate goals.  If you are able, ensure that you have 2 more gate goals than you have players.  If you want to make it more game-like for your players, divide the players into two teams before you begin.  

Start with having the players dribbling through as many gate goals in 30 seconds.  This gets the players acclimated to the space and activity before you give them additional constraints.  You can add up all of the gates that one team made it through compared to another.  Variations on dribbling through the gates are to have players dribble through a gate and make a circle around one of the cones.  or have a player dribble through a gate, then turn around and dribble through the same gate in the opposite direction.  You can also have the players dribble up to the gate, "kill the ball" (leaving the ball in front of the gate) the player must then run through the gate and then come back to collect his/her ball.  Again, there are many different variations that you can use and be creative for the players to remain engaged and active.

One last activity that you can use with the same space, before just allowing the players to play 4v4 is a 2v2 game.  Using the same grid, create 2 very wide gate goals on each side of the grid.  Divide the two teams of players as shown with the coach on one side with all of the balls.  The coach starts the activity by playing a ball to a pair of players.  The team then tries to dribble through either gate goal with possession of their dribble.  If the defending pair wins the ball, they can then dribble through the 2 gate goals on the opposite side for a goal.